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This page provides access to all the information resources on the NICE Future website. Browse the entire catalogue below or select one or more topics and subtopics from the list at left to drill down through the collection.

 

This conference paper reviews the technologies that are applicable to nuclear desalination. The authors conclude that combining thermal and membrane desalination processes and technologies within a hybrid plant scheme, particularly when coupled to Nuclear Power Plant PWR, can reduce desalinated water costs in dual-purpose stations, add flexibility and better match the demand to the combined water and power production, and minimize the environmental impact of power desalination plants.
This document reports on a joint Institute for Nuclear Energy Science and Technology (INEST)/ Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) workshop on hybrid energy systems, which are defined as having multiple energy source inputs and two or more coupled subsystems leading to the production of one or more energy commodities as outputs.
This report quantifies greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the industrial sector and identifies opportunities for non-GHG-emitting thermal energy sources to replace the most significant GHG-emitting U.S. industries based on targeted process-level analysis of industrial heat requirements. The intent is to provide a basis for projecting opportunities for clean energy use; doing so provides a prospectus for small modular nuclear reactors (including nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems), solar industrial process heat and geothermal energy, according to the authors.
This technical analysis describes the design and efficiency of a district heating system using a GTHTR300 reactor in Hokkaido, Japan. The system goal is to provide structural heating and road snow melting using the reactor's waste heat while considering safety. The authors describe the differences in efficiency between single- and double-pipe implementations, and they present the relationship between efficiency, construction cost and long-term system economy.

This report from 1987 identifies nuclear power as the sole cost-effective clean energy source available at the time. The authors also identify constraints that developing countries might face in implementing a nuclear power program. They close by defining the role that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) can play in executing programs in developing nations and identifying recommendations to enable these efforts.

This paper examines the zero-emission credits (ZECs) offered to nuclear power producers in the U.S. states of Illinois and New York. The author concludes that while the legal argument for state jurisdiction may have prevailed, there is an argument against ZECs on economic optimality grounds.

This journal article presents two hybrid energy system (HES) models. One, termed traditional, produces electricity only and consists of a primary heat generator, a steam turbine generator, a wind farm and a battery storage. The other, termed advanced, includes the components present in the traditional model but also a chemical plant complex to repurpose excess energy for non-electricity services, such as for producing chemical goods.

This paper considers a generic thermal energy storage (TES) system as a retrofit to an existing nuclear power plant in the United States (Texas). The authors use a validated PLEXOS model of the Electric Reliability Council of Texas electric grid to simulate electricity market clearing in 2030. They use three scenarios of natural gas price forecasts with a coupled capacity expansion model to simulate the deployment of competing technologies.

This report provides technical and economic analysis of nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems, building on the case studies—and modifying the scenarios—of previous analysis by the authors. In this analysis, the Texas-synthetic gasoline scenario provides the basis; however, the industrial process is removed. Instead, the N-R HES sells heat directly to an industrial customer. Also included are subsystems that convert electricity to heat, thus allowing the renewable energy subsystem to generate heat and benefit from that revenue stream.