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This page provides access to all the information resources on the NICE Future website. Browse the entire catalogue below or select one or more topics and subtopics from the list at left to drill down through the collection.

 

This report from 1987 identifies nuclear power as the sole cost-effective clean energy source available at the time. The authors also identify constraints that developing countries might face in implementing a nuclear power program. They close by defining the role that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) can play in executing programs in developing nations and identifying recommendations to enable these efforts.

This paper examines the zero-emission credits (ZECs) offered to nuclear power producers in the U.S. states of Illinois and New York. The author concludes that while the legal argument for state jurisdiction may have prevailed, there is an argument against ZECs on economic optimality grounds.

This paper considers a generic thermal energy storage (TES) system as a retrofit to an existing nuclear power plant in the United States (Texas). The authors use a validated PLEXOS model of the Electric Reliability Council of Texas electric grid to simulate electricity market clearing in 2030. They use three scenarios of natural gas price forecasts with a coupled capacity expansion model to simulate the deployment of competing technologies.

This report provides technical and economic analysis of nuclear-renewable hybrid energy systems, building on the case studies—and modifying the scenarios—of previous analysis by the authors. In this analysis, the Texas-synthetic gasoline scenario provides the basis; however, the industrial process is removed. Instead, the N-R HES sells heat directly to an industrial customer. Also included are subsystems that convert electricity to heat, thus allowing the renewable energy subsystem to generate heat and benefit from that revenue stream.
The report examines opportunities and challenges for policymakers, utilities, existing and startup energy companies, regulators, investors and other power-sector stakeholders, given advances in inherently safer technologies, a sharpened focus on the need to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the energy sector, and challenges faced by nuclear energy.
This journal article provides an overview of the economics, opportunities, barriers and technology for nuclear desalination. The author proposes a value stack approach for desalination but acknowledges that the countries for which the technology would be most useful are generally not nuclear powers.

The authors of this journal article propose a nuclear renewable energy integration (NREI) system that incorporates nuclear and wind energies in combination with high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE) to yield hydrogen. The nuclear component is represented by a small modular gas-cooled reactor. The authors compare the economics of three cases: nuclear power plant, nuclear and wind-combined facility, and a nuclear-wind-hydrogen production facility, using wholesale electricity prices and market conditions from the PJM deregulated and the Mid-C regulated market hubs.